Miguel Mendez's picture

Miguel Mendez

Associate Environmental Scientist
Clean Water Program
Bay Regional Monitoring Program
5107467319

Miguel Mendez is an Associate Environmental Science for the Clean Water Program and Bay Regional Monitoring Program at SFEI focusing on emerging contaminants. He received his M.S. in Environmental Engineering from Stanford University and a B.A. in Chemistry from Williams College. Prior to working at SFEI, he studied the effects of sea level rise on the secondary wastewater treatment process as an intern at the Southeast Wastewater Treatment Plant in San Francisco.

Related Projects, News, and Events

PFAS in San Francisco Bay Water (News)

Scientists with the San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring Program (RMP) detected PFAS, also known as “forever chemicals,” at parts per trillion concentrations in the waters of the Bay. A recent report finds the contaminants present in Bay water including the well-studied PFOS and PFOA, as well as their replacements.

RMP Update (Project)

The Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in San Francisco Bay is an innovative collaboration of the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, the regulated discharger community, and the San Francisco Estuary Institute. It provides water quality regulators with the information they need to manage the Bay effectively. The RMP produces two types of summary reports: The Pulse of the Bay and the RMP Update. The Pulse focuses on Bay water quality and summarizes information from all sources.

Forum on PFAS elevates the perspectives of local fishing communities (News)

Known as “forever chemicals” due to their persistence in the environment, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a broad class of fluorine-rich specialty chemicals. Thousands of different PFAS are registered for use in consumer, commercial and industrial applications. Increased use has led to the widespread presence of PFAS in our natural environment, including San Francisco Bay. PFAS are a high priority for action at federal, state, and local levels due to the well-documented toxic properties of key members of this class of contaminants. 

Perfluoroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) (Project)

 

Virtual Forum on PFAS in San Francisco Bay Fish, February 4th, 2022

Thank you for joining environmental and public health agencies, representatives of tribes and local fishing communities, and the general public to discuss PFAS sources and the contamination of San Francisco Bay sport fish. This forum sought to build consensus for next steps to protect everyone who catches and eats fish from the Bay.

 

 

A Synthesis of Microplastic Sources and Pathways to Urban Runoff (News)

What do clothes dryers and car tires have in common? Both release microplastic pollution into the environment, according to a new investigation by scientists at the San Francisco Estuary Institute.