Gemma Shusterman's picture

Gemma Shusterman

Application Development Manager
Environmental Informatics Program
510-746-7389

Gemma Shusterman is a web application developer and has a particular interest in user interfaces and experiences. She received a BA from Mills College in Computer Science and and an MS from the MIT Media Lab. Prior to joining SFEI in 2014, she was involved with various aspects of web design and development and served as the producer for the online version of DISCOVER magazine and as an independent web developer, designer, and consultant.

Related Projects, News, and Events

Eelgrass Data Management and Project Tracking (Project)

Eelgrass (Zostera marina and Z. pacifica) is recognized as an important ecological resource in nearshore open coast areas, shallow bays, and estuaries throughout coastal California. 

Find more data in CD3! (News)

The Contaminant Data Display and Download Tool is a public tool for accessing and visualizing contaminant data. All data are comparable to CEDEN, the California Environmental Data Exchange Network.

We are happy to announce the release of some new enhancements to CD3 including:  

Visualizing and Sharing Intensive Data Assessments (Project)

With California's drought rapidly changing the outlook for natural resources, decision-makers must be equipped with information and tools that facilitate clear and rapid decisions. The proposed grant would fund the standardization, visualization, and sharing of Level 3 data. 

Satellite Imaging to Detect Cyanobacterial Blooms (Project)

Satellite remote sensing will aid the State of California in assessing cyanobacterial bloom threats to animal and human health across the state’s numerous large lakes. 

Habitat Restoration Project Tracking (Project)

This project expands the current capabilities of the wetland project tracking system for the monitoring and assessment of California’s aquatic resources to meet the project tracking, assessment, and reporting needs for current and planned habitat restoration in the San Francisco Bay-Delta and Central Valley.

Lahontan Water Board adopts Regional EcoAtlas Tools (News)

The Lahontan Water Board (Regional Water Board 6) has formally adopted EcoAtlas and the California Rapid Assessment Method (CRAM). This will enable the Water Board to visually track and assess the extent of project impacts on a watershed basis throughout the region.

Beginning August 1 of this year, 401 Certifications and Waste Discharge Requirements will require applicants to upload project information into EcoAtlas. Applicants will be encouraged to use CRAM in pre- and post- project assessments.

Get on the curve: Habitat Development Curves help determine the performance of on-the-ground projects (News)

How do you know whether your project assessment, conducted by the California Rapid Assessment Method, reflects an improvement that is aligned with ecosystem goals? Habitat Development Curves (HDCs) help to visualize and measure the performance of on-the-ground projects relative to ecosystem goals.

CRAM Bar-Built Estuarine (BBE) module now available to expand the applicability of CRAM (News)

With funding from the State Coastal Conservancy, SFEI staff developed the eCRAM data entry forms for uploading BBE assessments into the CRAM database. Public assessments can be viewed on EcoAtlas' interactive map and downloaded using the CRAM filter tool.

Evaluation of CRAM performance for assessing wetland stress, small wetlands, and wetland habitat development (Project)

Caltrans funded this wetlands research to fill important gaps in knowledge about the ability of the California Rapid Assessment Method (CRAM) to assess small wetlands, wetlands stress, and the rate at which wetland restoration projects develop into mature habitats. Caltrans proposed specific tasks based on the research priorities provided by the CRAM Commitee of the statewide California Wetlands Monitoring Workgroup.

New eelgrass survey data available on EcoAtlas (News)

Eelgrass (Zostera marina and Z. pacifica) is recognized as an important ecological resource in nearshore open coast areas, shallow bays, and estuaries throughout coastal California. Access to regional maps and related monitoring reports for eelgrass is crucial to monitor the extent of eelgrass habitat and how it is changing over time, evaluate the effects of coastal development projects on eelgrass habitat, and inform interested stakeholders and the public about eelgrass distribution.

Mapping Shoreline Change in San Pablo Bay (Project)

Using a systematic, empirical, and repeatable approach, we mapped the location of the shorelines in San Pablo Bay at three points in time: 1855, 1993, and 2010. We then measured rates of change over the long (1855-1993) and short-term (1993-2010) to identify zones of erosion, progradation, and areas that have remained stable.

California Wetlands Portal (Project)

The California Wetlands Portal, one of the State of California’s My Water Quality portals, is the common data management system for the State’s primary wetland protection policies and programs, including the 401 Certification and WDR Programs, the proposed Wetland and Riparian Protection Policy, and the State’s No-Net-Loss Policy.

Statewide Wetland Tracking, Science, and Policy Development Support (Project)

SFEI’s Wetland Science Focus Area’s Director, Josh Collins, is a leader in the coordination of statewide science advisory teams and acquiring funding to develop monitoring and assessment tools that support the State’s Wetland and Riparian Area Protection Policy.

Wetland Portal Data Entry for the San Diego Region (Project)

Information and maps for 168 projects from the San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board were uploaded to the Project Tracker database. These projects can be viewed on EcoAtlas and the California Wetlands Portal. This project also provided guidance and training to support the San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board's participation in the Online 401 Pilot Study.

California Rapid Assessment Method (CRAM): Bar-Built Estuarine Wetlands (Project)

 The CRAM Bar-Built Estuarine module is used for assessing reaches of coastal rivers and streams that are ecologically influenced by seasonal closures of their tidal inlets. 

SFEI provides perspective on emerging harmful bacterial blooms in the State's larger waterbodies (News)

The State has contracted SFEI to provide intellectual, scientific, and technical resources to support its efforts to monitor and report on the ever-growing problem of cyanobacterial blooms in its lakes and rivers. These blooms are such a serious concern because they can generate harmful toxins which can threaten wildlife, livestock, pets, and in certain cases, human life.

CD3 User Survey (News)

Help us improve CD3 to better meet your visualization and reporting needs by completing a brief survey. We're interested to learn which features you use and to read your suggestions on any desired, new functionality.

Other enhancements in this release include:

USGS StreamStats API available in EcoAtlas (News)

How can someone click on a map and almost immediately determine the upstream catchment area to that designated point? StreamStats is a web service provided by the US Geological Survey to perform that critical function.

The service can be seamlessly incorporated into web maps to enhance their catchment-finding abilities. In July 2015, USGS released a new version of their StreamStats service, which SFEI recently incorporated into EcoAtlas.

New Trends Charts and Data on Safe To Eat Portal (News)

Fish and shellfish are nutritious and good for you to eat. But some fish and shellfish may absorb toxic chemicals from the food they eat and the water in which they live. Some of these chemicals accumulate over time in the fish and shellfish - and in the people who eat fish and shellfish. Although the chemical levels are usually low, it is a good idea to learn about advisories and monitoring in water bodies where you fish, and for fish or shellfish you eat.