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Filters: Author is Adam Wong  [Clear All Filters]
2012
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2018
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Trowbridge, P.; Wong, A.; Davis, J.; Ackerman, J. 2018. 2018 RMP Bird Egg Monitoring Sampling and Analysis Plan. SFEI Contribution No. 891. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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Jabusch, T.; Trowbridge, P.; Wong, A.; Heberger, M. 2018. Assessment of Nutrient Status and Trends in the Delta in 2001–2016: Effects of drought on ambient concentrations and trends. SFEI Contribution No. 865. Aquatic Science Center: Richmond, CA.

Nutrients and the effects of nutrients on water quality in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a priority focus area for the Delta Regional Monitoring Program (Delta RMP). The Program’s first assessment question regarding nutrients is: “How do concentrations of nutrients (and nutrient-associated parameters) vary spatially and temporally?” In this analysis, we confirmed previously reported declining trends in the San Joaquin River for nutrient concentrations at Vernalis and chlorophyll-a concentrations at Buckley Cove and Disappointment Slough. A slight increasing trend for dissolved oxygen at Buckley Cove was also detected which could be confirmation that management actions for the San Joaquin River Dissolved Control Program are having the desired effect. Finally, at stations in Suisun Bay, the Confluence region, and Franks Tract, chlorophyll-a showed modest increasing trends, which were not evident in previous analyses. The new analyses presented in this report and the findings from earlier reports constitute encouraging early progress toward answering the Delta RMP’s assessment questions. Specifically, due to the existence of long-term data sets and synthesis efforts, spatial and temporal trends in the concentrations of nutrients and nutrient-related parameters are reasonably well understood and so are the magnitudes of the most important sources of nutrients from outside the Delta. However, additional synthesis work could be done to understand the factors behind these trends. Large knowledge gaps remain about nutrient sinks, sources, and processes within the Delta. The mechanistic, water quality-hydrodynamic models being developed for the Delta may be able to address these questions in the future.

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Yee, D.; Wong, A.; Hetzel, F. 2018. Current Knowledge and Data Needs for Dioxins in San Francisco Bay. SFEI Contribution No. 926. San Francisco Estuary Institute : Richmond, CA.
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Sedlak, M.; Sutton, R.; Wong, A.; Lin, D. 2018. Per and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in San Francisco Bay: Synthesis and Strategy. SFEI Contribution No. 867. San Francisco Estuary Institute : Richmond, CA.
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2019
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Yee, D.; Wong, A.; Buzby, N. 2019. Characterization of Sediment Contamination in South Bay Margin Areas. SFEI Contribution No. 962. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.

The Bay margins (i.e., mudflats and adjacent shallow areas of the Bay) are important habitats where there is high potential for wildlife to be exposed to contaminants. However, until recently, these areas had not been routinely sampled by the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in San Francisco Bay (RMP) due to logistical considerations. In 2015, the RMP conducted a spatially-distributed characterization of surface sediment contamination and ancillary characteristics within the RMP-defined Central San Francisco Bay margin areas. This was repeated in 2017 within South Bay, which for this report refers to the area collectively encompassing Upper South Bay (usually just called the “South Bay” segment in the Bay RMP, “Upper” added here to distinguish from the combined area), Lower South Bay, and “Extreme” Lower South Bay (previously named “Southern Sloughs”) margin areas.

Ambient margins data in South Bay provide a context against which the severity of contamination at specific sites can be compared. The baseline data could also be useful in setting targets and tracking improvements in watershed loads and their nearfield receiving waters, or for appropriate assessment of re-use or disposal of dredged sediment. These spatially distributed data also provide improved estimates of mean concentrations and contaminant inventories in margins. Based on data from this study, contamination in the margin areas accounts for 35% of PCB mass in the upper 15 cm of surface sediments in South Bay, which is approximately proportional to the relative area of the margin (34% of the region). In contrast, margins only contain 30% of the mercury mass in South Bay, somewhat less than their proportional area.

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Yee, D.; Wong, A. 2019. Evaluation of PCB Concentrations, Masses, and Movement from Dredged Areas in San Francisco Bay. SFEI Contribution No. 938. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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Sutton, R.; Lin, D.; Sedlak, M.; Box, C.; Gilbreath, A.; Holleman, R.; Miller, L.; Wong, A.; Munno, K.; Zhu, X.; et al. 2019. Understanding Microplastic Levels, Pathways, and Transport in the San Francisco Bay Region. SFEI Contribution No. 950. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.

Microplastics (particles less than 5 mm) are ubiquitous and persistent pollutants in the ocean and a pervasive and preventable threat to the health of marine ecosystems. Microplastics come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and plastic types, each with unique physical and chemical properties and toxicological impacts. Understanding the magnitude of the microplastics problem and determining the highest priorities for mitigation require accurate measures of microplastic occurrence in the environment and identification of likely sources.

To develop critical baseline data and inform solutions, the San Francisco Estuary Institute and the 5 Gyres Institute have completed the first comprehensive regional study of microplastic pollution in a major estuary. This project supported multiple scientific components to develop improved knowledge about and characterization of microparticles and microplastics in San Francisco Bay and adjacent National Marine Sanctuaries, with the following objectives:

  1. Contribute to the development and standardization of sample collection and analysis methodology for microplastic transportation research.
  2. Determine a baseline for future monitoring of microplastics in San Francisco Bay surface water, sediment, and fish, and in ocean waters outside the Golden Gate.
  3. Characterize pathways by which microplastics enter the Bay, including urban stormwater and treated wastewater effluent.
  4. Investigate the contribution of Bay microplastics to the adjacent National Marine Sanctuaries through computer simulations.
  5. Communicate findings to regional stakeholders and the general public through meetings and educational materials.
  6. Facilitate evaluation of policy options for San Francisco Bay, with recommendations on source reduction.

This document presents the findings of this three-year project. A companion document, “San Francisco Bay Microplastics Project: Science-Supported Solutions and Policy Recommendations,” has been developed by 5 Gyres using the findings of this study (Box and Cummins, 2019).

 (4.95 MB) (66.14 MB)
2021
Yee, D.; Wong, A.; Weaver, M. 2021. 2021 Quality Assurance Program Plan for the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in San Francisco Bay. SFEI Contribution No. 1048. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, California.
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2022
Sutton, R.; Lin, D. 2022. CECs in California’s Ambient Aquatic Ecosystems: Occurrence and Risk Screening of Key Classes. Miller, E., Wong, A., Mendez, M., Eds.. ASC Contribution. SFEI Contribution No. 1066. Aquatic Science Center: Richmond, CA.
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2023
Mendez, M.; Kleckner, A.; Sutton, R.; Yee, D.; Wong, A.; Davis, J.; Sigala, M. 2023. 2023 Bay Prey Fish and Near-field / Margins Sediment Sampling and Analysis Plan. SFEI Contribution No. 1141. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.

This is a sampling and analysis plan for the Bay Status and Trends (S&T) Prey Fish and Near-field / Margins Sediment monitoring for the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in San Francisco Bay (RMP). Bay margins are defined by the RMP as extending from Mean Higher High Water (MHHW) to 1 foot below Mean Lower Low Water (MLLW). These mud flats and adjacent shallow areas of the Bay are productive and highly utilized by biota of interest (humans and wildlife). Near-field stations are located near watershed inputs in the Bay. Prey fish are a key matrix to monitoring the status and impacts of contaminants, especially near margin areas where they have shown strong contamination signals in previous RMP studies. This monitoring design provides a spatially-distributed characterization of contaminant concentrations in fish and sediment found within the margins of Central Bay, South Bay, and Lower South Bay. This study builds on previous S&T efforts to characterize surface sediment contamination across the Bay while piloting routine monitoring of prey fish. Additional samples outside of S&T will be collected for special studies. A subset of samples will be archived for potential future analysis of emerging contaminants or other analyte groups.

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Kleckner, A.; Sutton, R.; Yee, D.; Wong, A.; Davis, J.; Salop, P. 2023. 2023 RMP Dry Season Water Cruise Plan. SFEI Contribution No. 1139. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.

This report details plans associated with the 2023 Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary (RMP) water cruise. The RMP water sampling program was redesigned in 2002 to adopt a randomized sampling design at thirty-one stations in place of the twenty-six base program stations sampled previously. In 2007, the number of stations was decreased to twenty-two stations, and it remains as such for 2023. The analytes for 2023 are based on the Status and Trends (S&T) Review process that started in 2020.

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Kleckner, A.; Sutton, R.; Yee, D.; Wong, A.; Davis, J.; Salop, P. 2023. 2023 RMP Sediment Cruise Sampling and Analysis Plan. SFEI Contribution No. 1138. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.

This report details plans associated with the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in the San Francisco Estuary (RMP) deep bay sediment cruise. The RMP, through the Status and Trends monitoring program, conducts routine monitoring of water, sediment and biological tissue. Deep bay stations (water depth lower than 1 foot below MLLW) have been sampled for the Status and Trends sediment program since its inception.  The current monitoring design (reflective of changes made to the Program through the Status and Trends Review process) calls for sampling frequency of deep bay sediment for CECs, PBDEs, and ancillary analytes every five years during the dry season. Every ten years, metals, PAHs, and PCBs will also be sampled. For 2023, sampling operations will entail dry season sample collection at 16 RMP sediment sampling stations for CECs, PBDEs, and ancillary analytes in Central Bay, South Bay, and Lower South Bay.

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Yee, D.; Wong, A. 2023. Re-evaluation of the Floating Percentile Method for Deriving Dredged Sediment Screening Guidelines. SFEI Contribution No. 1143. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, California.

This document summarizes a study conducted for the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in San Francisco Bay (RMP) to re-evaluate the use of the Floating Percentile Method
(FPM) to derive sediment screening guidelines for dredged material reuse in the San Francisco Bay Region. The Long Term Management Strategy (LTMS) has a goal to use at least 40% of the sediment dredged from San Francisco Bay for beneficial reuse (USACE, 1998). The suitability of dredged sediment for beneficial reuse is in part determined by concentrations of toxic pollutants.The San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board (SFB-RWQCB) issued draft screening criteria in 2000 to categorize the suitability of sediment for reuse as either “surface” sediment, that may be placed near the surface for re-use in wetlands, or “foundation” sediment, that is buried under sediment that meets surface criteria. Contaminant concentration guidelines for surface sediment are lower than foundation sediment, based on the assumption that biota are more likely to be exposed to surface sediment than deeper foundation sediment.

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