Sean Baumgarten's picture

Sean Baumgarten

Associate Environmental Scientist
Resilient Landscapes Program
Historical Ecology
(510) 746-7335

Sean Baumgarten joined SFEI’s Resilient Landscapes team in 2012. His research focuses on the historical ecology of California ecosystems, using archival data to reconstruct the form and function of past landscapes and understand how they have changed over time. Sean has conducted research on coastal, riverine, and terrestrial ecosystems throughout the Bay Area as well as in southern California and the Central Valley. Sean earned a Master of Environmental Science and Management degree with a specialization in Conservation Planning from the Bren School at UC Santa Barbara, where his research focused on developing fire management strategies for Tejon Ranch in Southern California. He received a B.S. in Wildlife, Fish, and Conservation Biology from UC Davis.

Related Projects, News, and Events

Historical Ecology for Lower Walnut Creek promises to deliver insights at an upcoming event (News)

SFEI scientists Sean Baumgarten and Scott Dusterhoff will present findings from the Lower Walnut Creek Historical Ecology Study at the Quadrennial Contra Costa County Creek and Watershed Symposium, to be held on December 3, 2015, at the Pleasant Hill Community Center.

Lower Novato Creek Vision Just Released! (News)

SFEI recently released a resilient landscape vision for lower Novato Creek that incorporates habitat restoration actions into flood risk management. The vision, developed in coordination with a team of regional science experts, highlights opportunities for restoring and sustaining vital tidal wetland habitats around lower Novato Creek while supporting a high level of flood protection under rising San Francisco Bay water levels.

Novato Creek Baylands Historical Ecology Study report now available (News)

SFEI recently completed an historical ecology study of lower Novato Creek in Marin County. The study was conducted as part of the larger Flood Control 2.0 project and was aimed at illustrating the change in creek and bayland habitat conditions over the past 120 years following the installation of flood control levees.