Sam Safran's picture

Sam Safran

Environmental Scientist
Resilient Landscapes Program
Delta Science & Management
Urban Nature Lab
(510) 746-7383

Sam joined SFEI's Resilient Landscapes program in 2012. His work focuses on understanding how ecosystems functioned in the past and how best to use this knowledge to inform present-day landscape-scale restoration and management. Along the way he relies heavily on geospatial analysis and landscape ecology. He also enjoys cartography and other forms of data visualization. Sam received his joint B.A. in Biology and Environmental Studies from Middlebury College in Vermont.

Related Projects, News, and Events

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Announcing SFEI's first binational study: The Tijuana River Valley Historical Ecology Investigation (News)

A new report shows how the Tijuana River Valley, which straddles the boundary between Southern California and northern Mexico, looked and functioned prior to the existence of the border wall, the city of Tijuana, and the state of California.

Tijuana River Valley Historical Ecology Investigation Published (News)

The Tijuana River Valley Historical Ecology Investigation—completed in January 2017—synthesized hundreds of historical maps, photographs, and texts to reconstruct the ecological, hydrological, and geomorphic conditions of the Tijuana River valley prior to major European-American landscape modification.

U.S. Coast Survey. San Diego Bay, California. 1857.
Courtesy of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

How to “ReWild” San Diego’s Mission Bay (News)

SFEI's Resilient Landscape Program recently completed a "reconnaissance" historical ecology study of San Diego's Mission Bay. This targeted project collected high-priority historical data (such as maps, photographs, and texts) that shed light on how Mission Bay and the surrounding region looked and functioned prior to major landscape modification during the 19th and 20th centuries.

Lower Novato Creek Vision Just Released! (News)

SFEI recently released a resilient landscape vision for lower Novato Creek that incorporates habitat restoration actions into flood risk management. The vision, developed in coordination with a team of regional science experts, highlights opportunities for restoring and sustaining vital tidal wetland habitats around lower Novato Creek while supporting a high level of flood protection under rising San Francisco Bay water levels.

EcoAtlas: New Map Enhancements (News)

The latest release of EcoAtlas (v4.1) includes two new map enhancements: