Lawrence Sim's picture

Lawrence Sim

Geospatial Software Engineer
Environmental Informatics Program
Geographic Information Systems
Software Engineering
510-746-7333

Lawrence joined SFEI in 2015 as a Geospatial Software Engineer for the Environmental Informatics team. He received his Bachelor's at UC Santa Barbara and master’s at Oregon State University, both in geography with emphases in geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing. Previously he worked on deepwater and offshore oil spill modeling for the US Department of Energy. He has experience in spatial analysis, numerical modeling, web-GIS and web-mapping, web and graphic design, remote sensing, cartography, GIS-programming, and data visualization.

At SFEI, Lawrence provides expertise in geospatial applications, both for GIS and web-application development. He has served as technical lead for a number of web applications and GIS tools for a variety of applications including fish contaminant data, satellite detection of harmful algal blooms, and microplastic pollution.

Related Projects, News, and Events

New data layers and Landscape Profile mode added to EcoAtlas (News)

New data layers and Landscape Profile mode have been added to EcoAtlas (ecoatlas.org), an online tool for visualizing the abundance, diversity, and condition of wetlands, along with the project activities that are affecting the landscape. Enhancements include:

Lahontan EcoAtlas Development (Project)

This project will create an EcoAtlas user community for the Lahontan region of the Sierra Nevada to develop capacities within the region to apply EcoAtlas through existing local, regional, state, and federal programs to track projects and summarize map-based and rapid assessment information at the watershed scale.

Microplastics and Harmful Algal Blooms in California's waters (News)

For the new microplastics study, please read this article. See below for additional information about the harmful algal blooms viewer.

Lahontan Water Board adopts Regional EcoAtlas Tools (News)

The Lahontan Water Board (Regional Water Board 6) has formally adopted EcoAtlas and the California Rapid Assessment Method (CRAM). This will enable the Water Board to visually track and assess the extent of project impacts on a watershed basis throughout the region.

Beginning August 1 of this year, 401 Certifications and Waste Discharge Requirements will require applicants to upload project information into EcoAtlas. Applicants will be encouraged to use CRAM in pre- and post- project assessments.

SFEI Journal Article on Mercury in Coastal Fish of Western North America (News)

A journal article published in April details the findings of a collaborative survey of contaminants in fish on the California coast conducted by the RMP, the California Surface Water Ambient Monitoring Program, and the Southern California Bight Program in 2009-2010. The paper used that strong dataset as a foundation for a broad review of mercury in fish on the coast of western North America.  This work was done as part of a series of articles summarizing mercury science for western North America in a special issue of Science of the Total Environment.

Get on the curve: Habitat Development Curves help determine the performance of on-the-ground projects (News)

How do you know whether your project assessment, conducted by the California Rapid Assessment Method, reflects an improvement that is aligned with ecosystem goals? Habitat Development Curves (HDCs) help to visualize and measure the performance of on-the-ground projects relative to ecosystem goals.

CRAM Bar-Built Estuarine (BBE) module now available to expand the applicability of CRAM (News)

With funding from the State Coastal Conservancy, SFEI staff developed the eCRAM data entry forms for uploading BBE assessments into the CRAM database. Public assessments can be viewed on EcoAtlas' interactive map and downloaded using the CRAM filter tool.

Evaluation of CRAM performance for assessing wetland stress, small wetlands, and wetland habitat development (Project)

Caltrans funded this wetlands research to fill important gaps in knowledge about the ability of the California Rapid Assessment Method (CRAM) to assess small wetlands, wetlands stress, and the rate at which wetland restoration projects develop into mature habitats. Caltrans proposed specific tasks based on the research priorities provided by the CRAM Commitee of the statewide California Wetlands Monitoring Workgroup.

SFEI provides perspective on emerging harmful bacterial blooms in the State's larger waterbodies (News)

The State has contracted SFEI to provide intellectual, scientific, and technical resources to support its efforts to monitor and report on the ever-growing problem of cyanobacterial blooms in its lakes and rivers. These blooms are such a serious concern because they can generate harmful toxins which can threaten wildlife, livestock, pets, and in certain cases, human life.