Julie Beagle's picture

Julie Beagle

Deputy Program Director
Environmental Scientist
Resilient Landscapes Program
Shoreline Resilience
Watershed Science & Management
510-746-7312

Julie Beagle is SFEI’s Deputy Program Director of the Resilient Landscapes Program, and a lead scientist for the organization’s climate adaptation efforts. Her work focuses on adaptation to sea level rise using nature-based strategies, and integrating science and policy to provide short and long-term adaptation pathways for use in planning processes. She developed the Operational Landscape Unit project as a way to facilitate integrated regional shoreline adaptation strategies. She is also focused on piloting new shoreline infrastructure adaptation strategies. She has led multiple projects and focus areas at SFEI, including restoration work in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, and advancing the science of riparian habitats, including Sycamore Alluvial Woodlands.

Julie joined SFEI in 2010 as a geomorphologist, with a focus on fluvial and tidal geomorphic processes in the San Francisco Bay Delta watershed. Previously, Julie worked at the California Land Stewardship Institute and served as a U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer in agroforestry in West Africa. She has a bachelor of arts in history and environmental science from the Barnard College of Columbia University, and a Master of  Landscape Architecture with an emphasis in environmental planning from the University of California at Berkeley.

Related Projects, News, and Events

New Life for Eroding Shorelines: Beach and Marsh Edge Change in the San Francisco Estuary (Project)

The New Life for Eroding Shorelines project explores living shoreline approaches for sea level rise adaptation that can reduce erosion at the marsh edge and improve habitat quality for marsh species. Solutions explored include reestablishing marsh-fringing barrier beaches to attenuate waves at the marsh edge and reintroducing California Sea Blite (Suaeda californica), a rare and endangered plant with the ability to climb driftwood and other shoreline features, providing much-needed high-tide refuge for marsh wildlife.

Ventura County Historical Ecology Study (Project)

This project investigated the historical ecological patterns and hydrological dynamics of most of lowland Ventura County.

Head of Tide (Project)

SFEI completed a pilot study focused on creating a framework for a rapid protocol that can be used to delineate the current and future head of tide zone for San Francisco Bay tributaries using both “desktop” and field investigations.

Shallow Groundwater Response to Sea Level Rise (Project)

As sea levels rise and extreme storms become more frequent, communities are developing climate adaptation plans to protect housing, jobs, ecosystems, and infrastructure from flooding. However, these plans often neglect an important potential flood hazard – emergent groundwater. Shallow groundwater in coastal communities will rise as sea levels rise, increasing the risk of flooding communities from below. The threat of rising groundwater levels was identified by the Coastal Hazards Adaptation and Resiliency Group as a critical data gap in regional climate resilience planning.

Resilience Atlas (News)

The Resilience Atlas is an interactive mapping platform that visualizes the past, present and future conditions of the Bay’s edge and surrounding watersheds by combining layers of information, such as shoreline infrastructure, shoreline change over time, and sea level rise. 

Photo by Jessica Christian / SF Chronicle

SFEI's and SPUR's Adaptation Atlas shared by multiple media outlets (News)

The newly released Adaptation Atlas (adaptationatlas.sfei.orghas been making waves on several significant media outlets, including the San Francisco Chronicle, the San Jose Mercury News, Politico, ABC 7 News, East Bay Times, and the Marin Independent Journal.

We welcome you to learn more about the adaptation strategies that might be best suited to your own "natural jurisdiction."

"A Delta Renewed" report released at the 2016 Bay-Delta Science Conference (News)

The San Francisco Estuary Institute (SFEI) released A Delta Renewed – A Guide to Science-Based Ecological Restoration in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

Mapping Shoreline Change in San Pablo Bay (Project)

Using a systematic, empirical, and repeatable approach, we mapped the location of the shorelines in San Pablo Bay at three points in time: 1855, 1993, and 2010. We then measured rates of change over the long (1855-1993) and short-term (1993-2010) to identify zones of erosion, progradation, and areas that have remained stable.

San Francisco Bay Shore Inventory (Project)

SFEI is developing an online interactive map to support regional planning and assessment given accelerated sea level rise around the Bay.

Resilient By Design: Science Advisors (Project)

The challenges of accelerating sea level rise and aging shoreline infrastructure are creating a once-in-a-century opportunity to redesign the Bay shore. Originally constructed with little regard for the Bay, the future shoreline can more successfully integrate the natural and built environments to make a healthier shore for both the Bay and local communities. New shoreline design approaches must incorporate the complex ecological and physical processes of our urbanized estuary while anticipating the future challenges of climate change and extreme weather.

Russian River Watershed Projects at the San Francisco Estuary Institute (Project)

Our projects in the Russian River Watershed help us to understand our past, understand our present, and envision our future. Learn more about what SFEI is doing in partnership with others to advance our scientific understanding of this valuable landscape.

San Francisco Bay Shoreline Adaptation Atlas: Working with Nature to Plan for Sea Level Rise (Project)

In partnership with SPUR, The Operational Landscape Units project, funded by the SF Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, will create a new way of looking at the Bay.

Resilience Atlas (Project)

The Resilience Atlas is a compilation of cutting-edge science, creative visions and relevant spatial data to support planners, designers, policy-makers, and residents in the creation of the healthy cities, shorelines and surrounding landscapes of the future. The main goal of the Resilience Atlas is to make the science of resilience more accessible to help communities successfully adapt and thrive in the face of climate change and other challenges.

Science Support for Resilient By Design Competition (News)

The challenges of accelerating sea level rise and aging shoreline infrastructure are creating a once-in-a-century opportunity to redesign the Bay shore. Originally constructed with little regard for the Bay, the future shoreline can more successfully integrate the natural and built environments to make a healthier shore for both the Bay and local communities. New shoreline design approaches must incorporate the complex ecological and physical processes of our urbanized estuary while anticipating the future challenges of climate change and extreme weather.

Photo: Leah Millis / The Chronicle 2015

Eleven years to save San Francisco Bay (News)

SFEI scientist Julie Beagle and SPUR-based collaborator Laura Tam co-authored an article featured in the SF Chronicle. Learn more about the urgency of the situation we face in the Bay Area...

Sycamore alluvial woodland in Palassou Ridge. Photo credit: Amy Richey

Sycamore Alluvial Woodland Habitat Mapping and Regeneration Studies (Project)

This study investigates the relative distribution, health, and regeneration patterns of two major stands of sycamore alluvial woodland (SAW) in Santa Clara County, representing managed and natural settings.  Using an array of ecological and geomorphic field analyses, we, along with our partners at H.T. Harvey, discuss site characteristics favorable to SAW health and regeneration, make recommendations for restoration and management, and identify next steps.

Napa Valley Historical Ecology Atlas (Project)

The Napa Valley Historical Ecology Atlas takes readers on a richly illustrated tour of the iconic Napa Valley landscape from 200 years ago to the present and future.

Using the pioneering SFEI Historical Ecology approach, the Atlas challenges many preconceived notions about the nature of California landscapes, and suggests strategies to increase the health and resilience of local watersheds based on an understanding of how natural systems function. The Atlas is designed to support a broad range of local efforts for ecological restoration and watershed stewardship in Napa Valley, while providing a new and accessible model for historical ecology studies in other regions.

Delta: McCormack-Williamson Tract (Project)

The McCormack-Williamson Tract (MWT) was purchased in 1999 by The Nature Conservancy with CALFED Ecosystem Restoration Program (ERP) funds. Though today it looks like many islands of the central Delta, it is situated in a unique position at the intersection between the historical north and central Delta, at the downstream end of the Mokelumne River delta. While it represents only a small portion (<0.2%) of the historical Delta, it lies in an area of hydrologic and ecological importance along the third largest river of the Delta, the Mokelumne River.

Delta Landscapes Project (Project)

The Delta Landscapes Project, which began in 2012 and will run through 2016, has developed a body of work to inform landscape-scale restoration of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta ecosystem.

The Mouth of Eden Creek

A New Atlas for Dealing With Rising Seas in the Bay Area (News)

SFEI's Julie Beagle penned a new article for Bay Nature, describing the importance of the new Adaptation Atlas, a guide for those around the Bay Area looking for the best ways to adapt their local area to sea-level rise