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Melwani, A. R.; Greenfield, B. K.; Byron, E. R. 2009. Empirical estimation of biota exposure range for calculation of bioaccumulation parameters. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management 5 . SFEI Contribution No. 573.
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Hale, T.; Azimi-Gaylon, S.; Fong, S.; Goodwin, P.; Isaac, G.; Osti, A.; Shilling, F.; Slawecki, T.; Steinberg, S.; Tompkins, M.; et al. 2015. Enhancing the Vision for Managing California's Environmental Information. SFEI Contribution No. 792. Delta Stewardship Council: Sacramento, CA.

The Environmental Data Summit, convened under the auspices of the Delta Stewardship Council’s Delta Science Program in June 2014, witnessed remarkable participation from experts across California, the nation, and even the world. Summit attendees from the public, private, federal, and non-profit sectors shared their views regarding the urgent needs and proposed solutions for California’s data-sharing and data-integration challenges, especially pertaining to the subject of environmental resource management in the era of “big data.” After all, this is a time when our data sources are growing in number, size, and complexity. Yet our ability to manage and analyze such data in service of effective decision-making lags far behind our demonstrated needs.

In its review of the sustainability of water and environmental management in the California Bay-Delta, the National Research Council (NRC) found that “only a synthetic, integrated, analytical approach to understanding the effects of suites of environmental factors (stressors) on the ecosystem and its components is likely to provide important insights that can lead to enhancement of the Delta and its species” (National Research Council 2012). The present “silos of data” have resulted in separate and compartmentalized science, impeding our ability to make informed decisions. While resolving data integration challenges will not, by itself, produce better science or better natural resource outcomes, progress in this area will provide a strong foundation for decision-making. Various mandates ranging from the California Water Action Plan to the President’s executive order demanding federal open data policies demonstrate the consensus on the merits of modern data sharing at the scale and function needed to meet today’s challenges.

This white paper emerges from the Summit as an instrument to help identify such opportunities to enhance California’s cross-jurisdictional data management. As a resource to policymakers, agency leadership, data managers, and others, this paper articulates some key challenges as well as proven solutions that, with careful and thoughtful coordination, can be implemented to overcome those obstacles. Primarily featured are tools that complement the State’s current investments in technology, recognizing that success depends upon broad and motivated participation from all levels of the public agency domain. Executive Summary

This document describes examples, practices, and recommendations that focus on California’s Delta as an opportune example likely to yield meaningful initial results in the face of pressing challenges. Once proven in the Delta, however, this paper’s recommended innovations would conceivably be applied statewide in subsequent phases.

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Cohen, A. N. 1996. Environmental Review and Mitigation of a Water Supply Project in California. A report for the Japanese Ministry of Construction, Tokyo.
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Salop, P.; Gunther, A.; Bell, D.; Cotsifas, J.; Gold, J.; Ogle, S. 2002. Episodic Ambient Water Toxicity in the San Francisco Estuary. SFEI Contribution No. 51. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland, CA.
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David, N.; Gluchowski, D. C.; Leatherbarrow, J. E.; Yee, D.; McKee, L. J. . 2015. Estimation of Contaminant Loads from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to San Francisco Bay. Water Environment Research 87 (4), 334-346.

Contaminant concentrations from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River watershed were determined in water samples mainly during flood flows in an ongoing effort to describe contaminant loads entering San Francisco Bay, CA, USA. Calculated PCB and total mercury loads during the 6-year observation period ranged between 3.9 and 19 kg/yr and 61 and 410 kg/yr, respectively. Long-term average PCB loads were estimated at 7.7 kg/yr and total mercury loads were estimated at 200 kg/yr. Also monitored were PAHs, PBDEs (two years of data), and dioxins/furans (one year of data) with average loads of 392, 11, and 0.15/0.014 (OCDD/OCDF) kg/yr, respectively. Organochlorine pesticide loads were estimated at 9.9 kg/yr (DDT), 1.6 kg/yr (chlordane), and 2.2 kg/yr (dieldrin). Selenium loads were estimated at 16 300 kg/yr. With the exception of selenium, all average contaminant loads described in the present study were close to or below regulatory load allocations established for North San Francisco Bay.

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Stevens, D. 2002. Estimation of Means, Totals, and Distribution Functions from Probability Survey Data. SFEI Contribution No. 110. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland, CA.
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Denslow, N.; Kroll, K.; Mehinto, A.; Maruya, K. 2018. Estrogen Receptor In Vitro Assay Linkage Studies. SFEI Contribution No. 888. San Francisco Estuary Institute : Richmond, CA.
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Cloern, J. E.; Barnard, P. L.; Beller, E. E.; Callaway, J.; Grenier, J. Letitia; Grossinger, R. M.; Whipple, A.; Mooney, H.; Zavaleta, E. 2016. Estuaries: Life on the edge. In Ecosystems of California. Ecosystems of California. University of California Press: Berkeley, CA. pp 359-388.
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Aquatic Habitat Institute. 1990. Estuarine Data Index: A Guide to Bay-Delta Research and Monitoring Programs, Volume I. SFEI Contribution No. 157. Aquatic Habitat Institute: RIchmond, CA. p 395.
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Aquatic Habitat Institute. 1990. Estuarine Index: A Guide to Bay-Delta Research and Monitoring Programs: Volume I. Association of Bay Area Governments Urban Runoff Studies, Association of Bay Area Governments Environmental Protection Agency. p 395.
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Hoenicke, R.; Leatherbarrow, J. E. 2000. The Estuary Interface Pilot Study: 1998 Progress Report. SFEI Contribution No. 49. San Francisco Estuary Institute.
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Werme, C. 2012. Estuary News RMP Insert 2012. Estuary News. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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Meadows, R. 2013. Estuary News RMP Insert 2013. Estuary News. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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David, N.; Greenfield, B. K.; Siemering, G. S. 2006. Evaluating impacts of Lake Maid plant control. Journal of Aquatic Plant Management 44, 60-66.
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Greenfield, B. K.; Siemering, G.; David, N. 2005. Evaluating impacts of Lake Sweeper plant control. J. of Aquatic Plant Management . SFEI Contribution No. 461.
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Gunther, A. J.; Davis, J. A. 1998. An evaluation of bioaccumulation monitoring with transplanted bivalves in the RMP. SFEI Contribution No. 322. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA. pp 187-200.
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Yee, D.; Wong, A. 2019. Evaluation of PCB Concentrations, Masses, and Movement from Dredged Areas in San Francisco Bay. SFEI Contribution No. 938. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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O'Connor, J. M. 1991. Evaluation of Turbidity and Turbidity Related Effects on the Biota of the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary. SFEI Contribution No. 169. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA. p 84.
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Collins, J. N. 2002. Executive Summary 2002 (Wetlands Science Program). SFEI Contribution No. 250. San Francisco Estuary Institute. p 4.
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Phillips, A. 1988. Executive Summary of the Monitoring of Toxic Contaminants in the San Francisco Bay-Delta: A Crtical Review. SFEI Contribution No. 151. San Francisco Estuary Institue: Richmond, CA. p 14.
Phillips, D. J. H. 1987. Executive Summary of Toxic Contaminats in the San Francisco Bay - Delta and Their Possible Biological Effects. SFEI Contribution No. 139. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA. p 15.
Collins, J. N. 2002. Executive Summary: SFEI Component of the Integrated Regional Wetlands Monitoring Pilot Project. SFEI Contribution No. 251. San Francisco Estuary Institute. p 2.
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Cohen, A. N. 1998. Exotic organisms; California's Emerging Environmental Challenges. California's Emerging Environmental Challenges; Proceedings of a Workshop, 5-9 to 5-13.
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Cohen, A. N. 2002. Exotic organisms in southern California Bays and Harbors. Marine Bioinvasions Conference . SFEI Contribution No. 481.
Cohen, A. N.; Lambert, C. C.; Harris, L. H.; Chapman, J. W.; Schwindt, E.; Reardon, K.; Rao, L. C.; Murray, S. N.; Ljubenkov, J. C.; Lambert, G.; et al. 2003. Exotic Organisms in Southern California Bays and Harbors. Page 22 in:. In Abstracts, Third International Conf. on Marine Bioinvasions, Mar. 16-19, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA. Abstracts, Third International Conf. on Marine Bioinvasions, Mar. 16-19, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA. p p. 22.
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Cohen, A. N. 2004. An Exotic Species Detection Program for Puget Sound. SFEI Contribution No. 380. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland.
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Cohen, A. N. 2004. An Exotic Species Detection Program for the Lower Columbia River Estuary. SFEI Contribution No. 381. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland.
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Cohen, A. N. 2004. An Exotic Species Detection Program for Tillamook Bay. SFEI Contribution No. 379. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland.
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Cohen, A. N. 1998. Exotic species in California's coastal waters. Sanctuary Currents '98, Symposium on the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.
Cohen, A. N. 1998. The exotic species threat to California's coastal resources. SFEI Contribution No. 386. American Society of Civil Engineers: Reston, VA. pp 1418-1426.
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Cohen, A. N. 1998. The exotic species threat to California's coastal resources. California and the World Ocean '97, 1418-1426.
Foley, M.; Christian, E.; Goeden, B.; Ross, B. 2020. Expert review of the sediment screening guidelines for the beneficial reuse of dredged material in San Francisco Bay. SFEI Contribution No. 978. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.

The beneficial reuse of dredged sediment is one strategy in a broader portfolio that is being developed for San Francisco Bay to help marshes adapt to rising sea level. Dredged sediment is currently being used in restoration projects around the Bay, but additional sediment is needed to meet the demand. The guidelines for determining if sediment is appropriate for beneficial reuse were developed twenty years ago. As part of assessing the role of dredged sediment in Bay restoration and adaptation strategies, the Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality (RMP) and stakeholders recognized the need to revisit the beneficial reuse guidelines for dredged sediment. In September 2019, the RMP convened a workshop that included four technical experts to review the beneficial reuse guidelines. The experts were asked to answer three questions: 1) Are the current screening guidelines appropriate for beneficial reuse? 2) Is the current screening process appropriate and adequate? If not, what are your recommendations for improving it? and 3) How should bioaccumulation potential be addressed for the beneficial reuse of sediment? Based on the discussion of these three questions, six recommendations emerged from the workshop.

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