Our library features many hundreds of entries.

To search among them, click "Search" below to pull down options, including filtering by document type, author, year, and keyword.
Find these options under "Show only items where." Or you can also sort by author, title, type, and year clicking the headings below.

Export 1634 results:
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z 
L
Lowe, S.; Hoenicke, R.; Davis, J. A. 1999. 1999 Quality Assurance Project Plan. SFEI Contribution No. 33. San Francisco Esturary Institute: Oakland.
 (172.85 KB)
 (7.14 MB)
 (8.66 MB)
 (253.97 KB)
 (168 KB)
 (1.58 MB)
 (741.82 KB)
Lin, D.; Davis, J. 2018. Support for Sediment Bioaccumulation Evaluation: Toxicity Reference Values for the San Francisco Bay. SFEI Contribution No. 916. San Francisco Estuary Institute : Richmond, CA.
 (317.14 KB)
Lin, D.; Sutton, R.; Sun, J.; Ross, J. 2018. Screening of Pharmaceuticals in San Francisco Bay Wastewater. SFEI Contribution No. 910. San Francisco Estuary Institute : Richmond, CA.
 (1.06 MB)
Lin, D.; Sun, J.; Yee, D.; Franz, A.; Trowbridge, P.; Salop, P. 2017. 2017 RMP Water Cruise Plan. SFEI Contribution No. 845. San Francisco Estuary Institute : Richmond, CA.
 (3.63 MB)
 (1.33 MB)
Lin, D.; Sutton, R. 2018. Alternative Flame Retardants in San Francisco Bay: Synthesis and Strategy. SFEI Contribution No. 885. San Francisco Estuary Institute : Richmond, CA.
 (298.68 KB)
 (1.29 MB)
 (1.53 MB)
 (3.9 MB)
 (4.64 MB)
 (11.54 MB)
 (11.37 MB)
 (8.15 MB)
 (1.4 MB) (12.83 MB) (20.17 MB)
 (1.37 MB)
Leatherbarrow, J. E.; Yee, D.; Davis, J. A. 2001. PCBs in effluent. SFEI Contribution No. 237.
K
 (928.6 KB)
 (58.68 KB)
Kucera, T.; Breauz, A.; Zielinski, W. 2002. Data Collection Protocol Montioring River Otter (Lutra [=Lontra] canadensis). SFEI Contribution No. 241. CA State University Stanislaus, U.S Forest Service, San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board: Oakland, CAStanislaus, CA. p 11.
 (2.85 MB)
Kramer, K. S. 1989. Inventory of Monitoring Programs in the San Francisco Bay and Delta. SFEI Contribution No. 156. AHI: Richmond, CA. p 48.
 (3.81 MB)
Kramer, K. S. 1989. Inventory of Current Monitoring Programs in the San Francisco Bay and Delta. SFEI Contribution No. 155. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA. p 39.
 (6.55 MB)
 (816.23 KB)
 (545.86 KB)
 (224.76 KB)
 (267.06 KB)
 (2.22 MB)
 (6.92 MB)
 (875.49 KB) (345.92 KB)
 (565.23 KB)
 (4.74 MB)
 (3.43 MB)
 (1.52 MB)
 (6.55 MB)
 (1.16 MB)
 (84.32 MB)
King, A. 2019. Wind Over San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta: Forcing for Hydrodynamic Models. SFEI Contribution No. 937. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
 (9.17 MB)
Kerrigan, J. F.; Engstrom, D. R.; Yee, D.; Sueper, C.; Erickson, P. R.; Grandbois, M.; McNeill, K.; Arnold, W. A. 2015. Quantification of Hydroxylated Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (OH-BDEs), Triclosan, and Related Compounds in Freshwater and Coastal Systems. PLOS ONE . SFEI Contribution No. 765.

Hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-BDEs) are a new class of contaminants of emerging concern, but the relative roles of natural and anthropogenic sources remain uncertain. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are used as brominated flame retardants, and they are a potential source of OH-BDEs via oxidative transformations. OH-BDEs are also natural products in marine systems. In this study, OH-BDEs were measured in water and sediment of freshwater and coastal systems along with the anthropogenic wastewater-marker compound triclosan and its photoproduct dioxin, 2,8-dichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. The 6-OH-BDE 47 congener and its brominated dioxin (1,3,7-tribromodibenzo-p-dioxin) photoproduct were the only OH-BDE and brominated dioxin detected in surface sediments from San Francisco Bay, the anthropogenically impacted coastal site, where levels increased along a north-south gradient. Triclosan, 6-OH-BDE 47, 6-OH-BDE 90, 6-OH-BDE 99, and (only once) 6’-OH-BDE 100 were detected in two sediment cores from San Francisco Bay. The occurrence of 6-OH-BDE 47 and 1,3,7-tribromodibenzo-p-dioxin sediments in Point Reyes National Seashore, a marine system with limited anthropogenic impact, was generally lower than in San Francisco Bay surface sediments. OH-BDEs were not detected in freshwater lakes. The spatial and temporal trends of triclosan, 2,8-dichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, OH-BDEs, and brominated dioxins observed in this study suggest that the dominant source of OH-BDEs in these systems is likely natural production, but their occurrence may be enhanced in San Francisco Bay by anthropogenic activities.

 (85.5 KB)
 (431.23 KB) (431.23 KB) (1.37 MB)
 (551.68 KB)
Kauhanen, P.; Wu, J.; Hunt, J.; McKee, L. 2018. Green Plan-IT Application Report for the East Bay Corridors Initiative. SFEI Contribution No. 887. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
 (1.26 MB)
 (13.76 MB)
J
 (3.42 MB) (5.85 MB)
Johnston, D. 2002. Data Collection Protocol Yuma Bat (Myotis yumanensis). SFEI Contribution No. 259. H.T Harvey & Associates: San Jose, CA. p 7.
 (36.84 KB)
 (2.37 MB)
 (2.86 MB)
Jassby, A. D. 1996. Methods for Analysis of Spatial and Temporal Patterns. SFEI Contribution No. 18. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
 (7.14 MB)
Jarman, W. M.; Bacon, C.; Owen, B. 1999. Trace Organic Sampler Intercalibration Results. SFEI Contribution No. 34. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
 (265.13 KB)
Jarman, W. M.; Davis, J. A. 1997. Observations on trace organic concentrations in RMP water samples. SFEI Contribution No. 210. San Francisco Estuary Institute. pp 67-77.
Jahn, A. 2018. Gut Contents Analysis of Four Fish Species Collected in the San Leandro Bay RMP PCB Study in August 2016. SFEI Contribution No. 900. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
 (1.76 MB)
 (7.95 MB)
 (796.56 KB)
Jabusch, T.; Trowbridge, P.; Wong, A.; Heberger, M. 2018. Assessment of Nutrient Status and Trends in the Delta in 2001–2016: Effects of drought on ambient concentrations and trends. SFEI Contribution No. 865. Aquatic Science Center: Richmond, CA.

Nutrients and the effects of nutrients on water quality in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is a priority focus area for the Delta Regional Monitoring Program (Delta RMP). The Program’s first assessment question regarding nutrients is: “How do concentrations of nutrients (and nutrient-associated parameters) vary spatially and temporally?” In this analysis, we confirmed previously reported declining trends in the San Joaquin River for nutrient concentrations at Vernalis and chlorophyll-a concentrations at Buckley Cove and Disappointment Slough. A slight increasing trend for dissolved oxygen at Buckley Cove was also detected which could be confirmation that management actions for the San Joaquin River Dissolved Control Program are having the desired effect. Finally, at stations in Suisun Bay, the Confluence region, and Franks Tract, chlorophyll-a showed modest increasing trends, which were not evident in previous analyses. The new analyses presented in this report and the findings from earlier reports constitute encouraging early progress toward answering the Delta RMP’s assessment questions. Specifically, due to the existence of long-term data sets and synthesis efforts, spatial and temporal trends in the concentrations of nutrients and nutrient-related parameters are reasonably well understood and so are the magnitudes of the most important sources of nutrients from outside the Delta. However, additional synthesis work could be done to understand the factors behind these trends. Large knowledge gaps remain about nutrient sinks, sources, and processes within the Delta. The mechanistic, water quality-hydrodynamic models being developed for the Delta may be able to address these questions in the future.

 (8.33 MB)
Jabusch, T.; Trowbridge, P.; Heberger, M.; Guerin, M. 2018. Delta Regional Monitoring Program Nutrients Synthesis: Modeling to Assist Identification of Temporal and Spatial Data Gaps for Nutrient Monitoring. SFEI Contribution No. 866. Aquatic Science Center: Richmond, CA.

Nutrient loads are an important water quality management issue in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) and there is consensus that the current monitoring activities do not collect all the information needed to answer important management questions. The purpose of this report is to use hydrodynamic model outputs to refine recommendations for monitoring nutrients and related conditions in the Delta. Two types of modeling approaches were applied: 1) volumetric water source analysis to evaluate the mix of source waters within each subregion; and 2) particle tracking simulations.The analysis revealed that each Delta subregion has a unique “fingerprint” in terms of how much of its water comes from different sources. Three major recommendations for a future monitoring design were derived from this analysis:

Recommendation #1: The subregions proposed for status and trends monitoring in a previous report should be redrawn to better reflect the mixtures of source waters.

Recommendation #2: Long-term water quality stations are needed in the North Delta, Eastside, and South Delta subregions.

Recommendation #3: Areas with a long-residence time and where mixing of different water sources occurs are potential for nutrient transformation hotspots. High-frequency water quality mapping of these areas has the

 (3.81 MB) (1 MB) (1.69 MB) (1.75 MB) (1.83 MB) (17.97 MB)
 (4.78 MB)
Jabusch, T. W.; Tjeerdema, R. S. 2006. Photodegradation of penoxsulam. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 54, 5958-5961.
 (3.74 MB) (5.45 MB) (16.05 MB) (3.03 MB) (523.1 KB)
 (1.28 MB)
Jabusch, T.; Trowbridge, P.; Heberger, M.; Orlando, J.; De Parsia, M.; Stillway, M. 2018. Delta Regional Monitoring Program Annual Monitoring Report for Fiscal Year 2015–16: Pesticides and Toxicity. SFEI Contribution No. 864. Aquatic Science Center: Richmond, CA.

The primary purpose of this report is to document the first year (FY15/16) of pesticide monitoring by the Delta Regional Monitoring Program (Delta RMP). This document reports the results from samples collected monthly from July 2015 through June 2016. The data described in this report are available for download via the California Environmental Data Exchange Network (CEDEN) website.

Pesticide monitoring of the Delta RMP includes chemical analysis and toxicity testing of surface water samples. The parameters analyzed include 154 current use pesticides, dissolved copper, field parameters, and “conventional” parameters (ancillary parameters measured in the laboratory, such as dissolved/particulate organic carbon and hardness). Toxicity tests included an algal species (Selenastrum capricornutum, also known as Raphidocelis subcapitata), an invertebrate (Ceriodaphnia dubia, a daphnid or water flea), and a fish species (Pimephales promelas, fathead minnow). Toxicity testing included the evaluation of acute (survival) and chronic (growth, reproduction, biomass) toxicity endpoints. The surface water samples were collected from 5 fixed sites representing key inflows to the Delta that were visited monthly: Mokelumne River at New Hope Road, Sacramento River at Hood, San Joaquin River at Buckley Cove, San Joaquin River at Vernalis, and Ulatis Creek at Brown Road.

A total of 52 pesticides were detected above method detection limits (MDLs) in water samples (19 fungicides, 17 herbicides, 9 insecticides, 6 degradates, and 1 synergist). A total of 9 pesticides (5 herbicides, 3 insecticides, and 1 degradate) were detected in suspended sediments in 10 of a total of 60 samples collected during the study period. All collected samples contained mixtures of pesticides ranging from 2 to 26 pesticides per sample. From a total of 154 target parameters, 100 compounds were never detected in any of the samples.

 (1.34 MB) (519.77 KB) (2.07 MB) (1.19 MB) (339.08 KB) (26.29 MB) (57.12 MB) (298.4 KB) (3.5 MB) (312.86 KB) (24.34 KB) (180.15 KB) (718.56 KB)
Jabusch, T. W.; Trowbridge, P. 2016. Nutrient Monitoring Planning Workshop - Summary of Existing Nutrient Monitoring Programs, Data Gaps, and Potential Delta RMP “No Regrets” Monitoring Activities. Aquatic Science Center: Richmond, CA.

This report was prepared as a briefing document for a September 2016 workshop held in Sacramento by the Delta Regional Monitoring Program. The purpose of the workshop was to plan how to invest in nutrients-related studies in order to inform better management of Delta waterways. First, the report compiles information about the major existing nutrient monitoring programs in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Next, it outline options for “no regrets” actions for workshop participants to review. The report summarizes interviews with representatives of Delta monitoring and resource management programs, describes current monitoring efforts in the Delta, and presents the conclusions and recommendations from recently completed data syntheses.

 (2.79 MB)
 (10.36 MB)
Jabusch, T.; Trowbridge, P. 2018. Microbial Water Quality at Minimally Human-Impacted Reference Beaches in Northern California. SFEI Contribution No. 858. San Francisco Estuary Institute : Richmond, CA.
 (3.87 MB)
Jabusch, T. W.; Bernstein, B. 2010. Delta Regional Monitoring Program. Aquatic Science Center: Oakland, CA.
 (4.48 MB)
Jabusch, T. W. 2010. Selenium in the Grasslands Watershed. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland, CA. pp 267-294.
Jabusch, T. W.; Tjeerdema, R. S. 2006. Microbial degradation of penoxsulam in flooded rice field soils. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 54, 5962-5967.
 (2.93 MB)
Jabusch, T. W.; Tjeerdema, R. S. 2007. Chemistry and Fate of Triazolopyrimidine Sulfonamide Herbicides. Reviews of Environmental Contamination & Toxicology.