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E
San Francisco Estuary Institute (SFEI). 2016. 2016 Regional Monitoring Program Update. SFEI Contribution No. 790. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 2011. 2009 Annual Monitoring Results. SFEI Contribution No. 629. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 1994. 1993 Annual Report: San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances. SFEI Contribution No. 4. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 1999. Report of the Pesticide Workgroup. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 1999. 1997 Annual Report: San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances. SFEI Contribution No. 37. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 1999. Report of the Bioaccumulation Workshop. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 2010. 2008 RMP Annual Monitoring Results. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 2000. 1998 Annual Results: San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances. SFEI Contribution No. 334. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 2007. CALFED's Fish Mercury Project. SFEI Contribution No. 531. San Francisco Estuary Institute and CALFED.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 2001. 1999 Annual Results: San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances. SFEI Contribution No. 351. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 2015. RipZET: The Riparian Zone Estimation Tool version 2.0. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 2015. 2013-2014 Annual Monitoring Results. SFEI Contribution No. 758. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 2002. 2000 Annual Results: San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances. SFEI Contribution No. 238. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 2015. RipZET User's Manual v1.0. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 2004. 2002 Annual Results. SFEI Contribution No. 318.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 2003. 2001 Annual Results: San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances. SFEI Contribution No. 280. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 2005. 2003 Annual Results: San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances. SFEI Contribution No. 398. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 1997. 1995 Annual Report: San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances. SFEI Contribution No. 21. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 1998. 1996 Annual Report: San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances. SFEI Contribution No. 219. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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San Francisco Estuary Institute. 1996. 1994 Annual Report: San Francisco Estuary Regional Monitoring Program for Trace Substances. SFEI Contribution No. 189. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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Dusterhoff, S. D.; Doehring, C.; Baumgarten, S.; Grossinger, R. M.; Askevold, R. A. 2016. Resilient Landscape Vision for Lower Walnut Creek: Baseline Information and Management Strategies. Flood Control 2.0. An SFEI-ASC Resilient Landscape Program report developed in cooperation with the Flood Control 2.0 Regional Science Advisors and Contra Costa County Flood Control and Water Conservation District. SFEI Contribution No. 782. San Francisco Estuary Institute-Aquatic Science Center: Richmond, CA.

Lower Walnut Creek (Contra Costa County, CA) and its surrounding landscape have undergone considerable land reclamation and development since the mid-nineteenth century. In 1965, the lower 22 miles of Walnut Creek and the lower reaches of major tributaries were converted to flood control channels to protect the surrounding developed land. In the recent past, sediment was periodically removed from the lower Walnut Creek Flood Control Channel to provide flow capacity and necessary flood protection. Due to the wildlife impacts and costs associated with this practice, the Contra Costa County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (District) is now seeking a new channel management approach that works with natural processes and benefits people and wildlife in a cost-effective manner. Flood Control 2.0 project scientists and a Regional Science Advisory Team (RSAT) worked with the District to develop a long-term management Vision for lower Walnut Creek that could result in a multi-benefit landscape that restores lost habitat and is resilient under a changing climate.

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Dusterhoff, S.; Pearce, S.; McKee, L. J. .; Doehring, C.; Beagle, J.; McKnight, K.; Grossinger, R.; Askevold, R. A. 2017. Changing Channels: Regional Information for Developing Multi-benefit Flood Control Channels at the Bay Interface. Flood Control 2.0. SFEI Contribution No. 801. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.

Over the past 200 years, many of the channels that drain to San Francisco Bay have been modified for land reclamation and flood management. The local agencies that oversee these channels are seeking new management approaches that provide multiple benefits and promote landscape resilience. This includes channel redesign to improve natural sediment transport to downstream bayland habitats and beneficial re-use of dredged sediment for building and sustaining baylands as sea level continues to rise under a changing climate. Flood Control 2.0 is a regional project that was created to help develop innovative approaches for integrating habitat improvement and resilience into flood risk management at the Bay interface. Through a series of technical, economic, and regulatory analyses, the project addresses some of the major elements associated with multi-benefit channel design and management at the Bay interface and provides critical information that can be used by the management and restoration communities to develop long-term solutions that benefit people and wildlife.

This Flood Control 2.0 report provides a regional analysis of morphologic change and sediment dynamics in flood control channels at the Bay interface, and multi-benefit management concepts aimed at bringing habitat restoration into flood risk management. The findings presented here are built on a synthesis of historical and contemporary data that included input from Flood Control 2.0 project scientists, project partners, and science advisors. The results and recommendations, summarized below, will help operationalize many of the recommendations put forth in the Baylands Ecosystem Habitat Goals Science Update (Goals Project 2015) and support better alignment of management and restoration communities on multi-benefit bayland management approaches.

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Dusterhoff, S. D.; Doehring, C.; Shusterman, G. 2014. How Creeks Meet the Bay: Changing Interfaces (Interactive web map).

San Francisco Bay’s connections to local creeks are integral to its health. These fluvial-tidal (F-T) interfaces are the points of delivery for freshwater, sediment, contaminants, and nutrients. The ways in which the F-T interface has changed affect flooding dynamics, ecosystem functioning, and resilience to a changing climate. As the historical baylands have been altered, the majority of contemporary F-T interface types have changed leading to additional F-T interface types within the present-day landscape. Illustrations of each F-T interface type and methods for classification are available here

This project is part of Flood Control 2.0. For further information please visit this project page

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Doehring, C.; Beagle, J.; Lowe, J.; Grossinger, R. M.; Salomon, M.; Kauhanen, P.; Nakata, S.; Askevold, R. A.; Bezalel, S. N. 2016. San Francisco Bay Shore Inventory: Mapping for Sea Level Rise Planning. SFEI Contribution No. 779. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.

With rising sea levels and the increased likelihood of extreme weather events, it is important for regional agencies and local municipalities in the San Francisco Bay Area to have a clear understanding of the status, composition, condition, and elevation of our current Bay shore, including both natural features and built infrastructure.


The purpose of this Bay shore inventory is to create a comprehensive and consistent picture of today’s Bay shore features to inform regional planning. This dataset includes both structures engineered expressly for flood risk management (such as accredited levees) and features that affect flooding at the shore but are not designed or maintained for this purpose (such as berms, road embankments, and marshes). This mapping covers as much of the ‘real world’ influence on flooding and flood routing as possible, including the large number of non-accredited structures.
This information is needed to:

  1. identify areas vulnerable to flooding.
  2. identify adaptation constraints due to present Bay shore alignments; and
  3. suggest opportunities where beaches, wetlands, and floodplains can be maintained or restored and integrated into flood risk management strategies.

The primary focus of the project is therefore to inform regional planners and managers of Bay shore characteristics and vulnerabilities. The mapping presented here is neither to inform FEMA flood designation nor is it a replacement for site-specific analysis and design.


The mapping consists of two main elements:

  1. Mapping of Bay shore features (levees, berms, roads, railroads, embankments, etc.) which could affect flooding and flood routing.
  2. Attributing Bay shore features with additional information including elevations, armoring, ownership (when known), among others.

SFEI delineated and characterized the Bay shore inland to 3 meters (10ft) above mean higher high water (MHHW) to accommodate observed extreme water levels and the commonly used range of future sea level rise (SLR) scenarios. Elevated Bay shore features were mapped and classified as engineered levees, berms, embankments, transportation structures, wetlands, natural shoreline, channel openings, or water control structures. Mapped features were also attributed with elevation (vertical accuracy of <5cm reported in 30 meter (100ft) segments from LiDAR derived digital elevation models (DEMs), FEMA accreditation status, fortification (e.g., riprap, buttressing), frontage (e.g., whether a feature was fronted by a wetland or beach), ownership, and entity responsible for maintenance. Water control structures, ownership, and maintenance attributes were captured where data was available (not complete for entire dataset). The dataset was extensively reviewed and corrected by city, county, and natural resource agency staff in each county around the Bay. This report provides further description of the Bay shore inventory and methods used for developing the dataset. The result is a publicly accessible GIS spatial database.

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Denslow, N.; Kroll, K.; Mehinto, A.; Maruya, K. 2018. Estrogen Receptor In Vitro Assay Linkage Studies. SFEI Contribution No. 888. San Francisco Estuary Institute : Richmond, CA.
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Davis, J.; Yee, D.; Fairey, R.; Sigala, M. 2017. San Leandro Bay PCB Study Data Report. SFEI Contribution No. 855. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Richmond, CA.
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Davis, J. A. 2002. A PCB Budget for San Francisco Bay. SFEI Contribution No. 376. San Francisco Estuary Institute: Oakland, CA.