Steve Hagerty's picture

Steven  Hagerty

Environmental Analyst
Resilient Landscapes Program
510-746-7349 x7349

Steven Hagerty joined SFEI's Resilient Landscapes team as an Environmental Analyst in 2016. His work focuses on applied science projects relating to landscape ecology in wetland and urban environments. Steve earned Bachelor's degrees in Environmental Science and Economics from Brown University in 2015. At Brown, Steve worked in a wetland ecology lab on various projects centered around coastal ecosystem food webs. Prior to joining SFEI, Steve worked at the Natural Resources Conservation Service in Oregon, managing wetlands restoration projects on private lands. Steve is originally from Portland, Oregon.

Related Projects, News, and Events

Announcing the release of Re-Oaking Silicon Valley: Building Vibrant Cities with Nature (News)

Could restoring lost ecosystems to cities play a role in building ecological resilience across landscapes? In Re-oaking Silicon Valley, a new report by SFEI, we explore this opportunity in our region. Both beautiful and functional, native oaks can be excellent choices for streetscapes, backyards, and landscaping. Requiring little water after establishment, oaks can save money by reducing irrigation requirements while sequestering more carbon than most other urban trees common to our region.

Sycamore Alluvial Woodland Habitat Mapping and Regeneration Study Released (News)

California sycamore (Platanus racemosa) is an iconic native tree species found in California and northern Baja California. The health and regeneration of California sycamore have been substantially affected by a wide range of factors, including hydrologic modifications of creeks, hybridization with London plane tree (Platanus x hispanica), and anthracnose. San Francisco Estuary Institute and H. T.

Sycamore alluvial woodland in Palassou Ridge. Photo credit: Amy Richey

Sycamore Alluvial Woodland Habitat Mapping and Regeneration Study (Project)

This study investigates the relative distribution, health, and regeneration patterns of two major stands of sycamore alluvial woodland (SAW) in Santa Clara County, representing managed and natural settings.  Using an array of ecological and geomorphic field analyses, we, along with our partners at H.T. Harvey, discuss site characteristics favorable to SAW health and regeneration, make recommendations for restoration and management, and identify next steps.