Shira Bezalel's picture

Shira Bezalel

Database Administrator / Desktop Support Manager
Environmental Informatics Program
510-746-7304

Shira Bezalel joined SFEI in October 2005, bringing to the organization expertise in database programming and design and geographic information systems. Shira has been involved in a number of technology projects over the years at SFEI, including the redesign of eCRAM which is used for storing CRAM (California Rapid Assessment Method) assessment data, as well as Project Tracker, CD3 and the Safe to Eat Portal (STEP). Prior to joining SFEI, Shira worked for over eight years in the Bay Area software industry where she was responsible for supporting administrators of enterprise-scale database management systems. Shira has a B.A. in Economics from State University of New York at Binghamton and a certificate in Geographic Information Systems from San Francisco State University. 

Related Projects, News, and Events

Healthy Streams Portal (Project)

Healthy streams, rivers, and lakes provide safe drinking water, recreational opportunities, and important habitat for species ranging from the red-shouldered hawk to steelhead to crayfish and dragonflies. Maintaining healthy streams, rivers, and lakes can reduce the need for water treatment and water supply costs and make landscapes more resilient to climate change.

Lahontan Water Board adopts Regional EcoAtlas Tools (News)

The Lahontan Water Board (Regional Water Board 6) has formally adopted EcoAtlas and the California Rapid Assessment Method (CRAM). This will enable the Water Board to visually track and assess the extent of project impacts on a watershed basis throughout the region.

Beginning August 1 of this year, 401 Certifications and Waste Discharge Requirements will require applicants to upload project information into EcoAtlas. Applicants will be encouraged to use CRAM in pre- and post- project assessments.

Photo by Jay Davis

SFEI Journal Article on Mercury in Coastal Fish of Western North America (News)

A journal article published in April details the findings of a collaborative survey of contaminants in fish on the California coast conducted by the RMP, the California Surface Water Ambient Monitoring Program, and the Southern California Bight Program in 2009-2010. The paper used that strong dataset as a foundation for a broad review of mercury in fish on the coast of western North America.  This work was done as part of a series of articles summarizing mercury science for western North America in a special issue of Science of the Total Environment.

RMP Update (Project)

The Regional Monitoring Program for Water Quality in San Francisco Bay is an innovative collaboration of the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board, the regulated discharger community, and the San Francisco Estuary Institute. It provides water quality regulators with information they need to manage the Bay effectively. The Program issues a report each year, the Pulse of the Bay in odd years and the RMP Update in even years.

Get on the curve: Habitat Development Curves help determine the performance of on-the-ground projects (News)

How do you know whether your project assessment, conducted by the California Rapid Assessment Method, reflects an improvement that is aligned with ecosystem goals? Habitat Development Curves (HDCs) help to visualize and measure the performance of on-the-ground projects relative to ecosystem goals.

CRAM Bar-Built Estuarine (BBE) module now available to expand the applicability of CRAM (News)

With funding from the State Coastal Conservancy, SFEI staff developed the eCRAM data entry forms for uploading BBE assessments into the CRAM database. Public assessments can be viewed on EcoAtlas' interactive map and downloaded using the CRAM filter tool.

Improving Knowledge of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (News)

 

New eelgrass survey data available on EcoAtlas (News)

Eelgrass (Zostera marina and Z. pacifica) is recognized as an important ecological resource in nearshore open coast areas, shallow bays, and estuaries throughout coastal California. Access to regional maps and related monitoring reports for eelgrass is crucial to monitor the extent of eelgrass habitat and how it is changing over time, evaluate the effects of coastal development projects on eelgrass habitat, and inform interested stakeholders and the public about eelgrass distribution.

Mapping Shoreline Change in San Pablo Bay (Project)

Using a systematic, empirical, and repeatable approach, we mapped the location of the shorelines in San Pablo Bay at three points in time: 1855, 1993, and 2010. We then measured rates of change over the long (1855-1993) and short-term (1993-2010) to identify zones of erosion, progradation, and areas that have remained stable.

California Wetlands Portal (Project)

The California Wetlands Portal, one of the State of California’s My Water Quality portals, is the common data management system for the State’s primary wetland protection policies and programs, including the 401 Certification and WDR Programs, the proposed Wetland and Riparian Protection Policy, and the State’s No-Net-Loss Policy.

Online 401 Application Tool (Project)

This tool provides a permit negotiation tool for applicants and Regional Water Board staff to work together on preparing a permit for a 401 Water Quality Certification or Waste Discharge Report for projects impacting waters of the US or California. The application tool will streamline 401 Certification applications, provide access to historical 401 cases, and enable standardized reports on the status and trends of 401 projects and ambient conditions for watersheds, regions, and statewide.

Wetland Portal Data Entry for the San Diego Region (Project)

Information and maps for 168 projects from the San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board were uploaded to the Project Tracker database. These projects can be viewed on EcoAtlas and the California Wetlands Portal. This project also provided guidance and training to support the San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board's participation in the Online 401 Pilot Study.

California Rapid Assessment Method (CRAM): Bar-Built Estuarine Wetlands (Project)

 The CRAM Bar-Built Estuarine module is used for assessing reaches of coastal rivers and streams that are ecologically influenced by seasonal closures of their tidal inlets. 

California Rapid Assessment Method (CRAM): Slope Wetlands (Project)

CRAM is a cost-effective and scientifically defensible rapid assessment method for monitoring and assessing the ecologcial conditions of wetlands throughout California. It takes less than half a day to assess a wetland area, and is designed evaluate the condition of the wetland based on it's landscape setting, hydrology, physical structure and biological structure.  Because the methodology is standardized for over seven types of wetlands, ecological condition scores can be compared at the local, regional and statewide landscape scales.  

Transitional Ecotone Vegetation Data Management System (Project)

Upload and access data from vegetation surveys of intertidal-upland ecotones

CD3 User Survey (News)

Help us improve CD3 to better meet your visualization and reporting needs by completing a brief survey. We're interested to learn which features you use and to read your suggestions on any desired, new functionality.

Other enhancements in this release include:

USGS StreamStats API available in EcoAtlas (News)

How can someone click on a map and almost immediately determine the upstream catchment area to that designated point? StreamStats is a web service provided by the US Geological Survey to perform that critical function.

The service can be seamlessly incorporated into web maps to enhance their catchment-finding abilities. In July 2015, USGS released a new version of their StreamStats service, which SFEI recently incorporated into EcoAtlas.

New Trends Charts and Data on Safe To Eat Portal (News)

Fish and shellfish are nutritious and good for you to eat. But some fish and shellfish may absorb toxic chemicals from the food they eat and the water in which they live. Some of these chemicals accumulate over time in the fish and shellfish - and in the people who eat fish and shellfish. Although the chemical levels are usually low, it is a good idea to learn about advisories and monitoring in water bodies where you fish, and for fish or shellfish you eat.

EcoAtlas: New Map Enhancements (News)

The latest release of EcoAtlas (v4.1) includes two new map enhancements:

The launch of the SF Bay Nutrients Visualization Tool (News)

This visualization tool facilitates intuitive comparison of continuous data from around the Bay, and across a variety of analytes, to demonstrate the potential for collaborative monitoring across programs.