Julie Beagle's picture

Julie Beagle

Environmental Scientist
Resilient Landscapes Program
510-746-7312

Julie Beagle joined SFEI in 2010 as a geomorphologist in the Resilient Landscape program. Her work focuses on fluvial and tidal geomorphic processes in Bay Area rivers and wetlands, and she is particularly interested in the physical and biological responses to sea level rise and climate change. Her work also examines how landscapes have changed since European contact, and uses this information to guide landscape-scale restoration strategies in Bay Area watersheds and the Delta. She received a master’s degree from UC Berkeley in Environmental Planning in 2010 focusing on geomorphology and watershed management. Previously, Julie worked at the California Land Stewardship Institute and served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in agroforestry in West Africa. She has a bachelor of arts in history and environmental science from Barnard College, Columbia University.

Related Projects, News, and Events

Delta Landscapes Project (Project)

The Delta Landscapes Project, which began in 2012 and will run through 2016, has developed a body of work to inform landscape-scale restoration of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta ecosystem.

Sycamore Alluvial Woodland Habitat Mapping and Regeneration Study Released (News)

California sycamore (Platanus racemosa) is an iconic native tree species found in California and northern Baja California. The health and regeneration of California sycamore have been substantially affected by a wide range of factors, including hydrologic modifications of creeks, hybridization with London plane tree (Platanus x hispanica), and anthracnose. San Francisco Estuary Institute and H. T.

Sycamore alluvial woodland in Palassou Ridge. Photo credit: Amy Richey

Sycamore Alluvial Woodland Habitat Mapping and Regeneration Study (Project)

This study investigates the relative distribution, health, and regeneration patterns of two major stands of sycamore alluvial woodland (SAW) in Santa Clara County, representing managed and natural settings.  Using an array of ecological and geomorphic field analyses, we, along with our partners at H.T. Harvey, discuss site characteristics favorable to SAW health and regeneration, make recommendations for restoration and management, and identify next steps.

"A Delta Renewed" report released at the 2016 Bay-Delta Science Conference (News)

The San Francisco Estuary Institute (SFEI) released A Delta Renewed – A Guide to Science-Based Ecological Restoration in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

San Francisco Bay Shore Inventory (Project)

SFEI is developing an online interactive map to support regional planning and assessment given accelerated sea level rise around the Bay.

Now Available: SF Bay Shore Inventory: Mapping for Sea Level Rise Regional Dataset (News)

SFEI and the San Francisco Estuary Partnership are proud to announce the release of the SF Bay Shore Inventory: Mapping for Sea Level Rise. This dataset provides a comprehensive and consistent picture of today’s Bay shore (up to MHHW + 10ft) for all nine Bay Area counties. The mapping captures features which affect flooding and flood routing (e.g., engineered levees, berms, embankments, roads, wetlands, etc.).

Mapping Shoreline Change in San Pablo Bay (Project)

Using a systematic, empirical, and repeatable approach, we mapped the location of the shorelines in San Pablo Bay at three points in time: 1855, 1993, and 2010. We then measured rates of change over the long (1855-1993) and short-term (1993-2010) to identify zones of erosion, progradation, and areas that have remained stable.

Alameda Creek Historical Ecology Study (Project)

The Alameda Creek Historical Ecology Study assesses watershed conditions prior to significant Euro-American modification, as a basis for understanding subsequent changes in watershed structure and function, and potential options for future environmental management. The geographic focus is the floodplains, valleys, and alluvial plains adjacent to Alameda Creek (to the diversion dam) and its tributaries. This includes the Livermore and Amador valleys, Sunol Valley and Niles Canyon, and the Niles cone and adjoining baylands. A pilot portion of the project also focuses on documenting landscape changes in the uplands of the San Antonio Creek watershed.

Head of Tide (Project)

SFEI completed a pilot study focused on creating a framework for a rapid protocol that can be used to delineate the current and future head of tide zone for San Francisco Bay tributaries using both “desktop” and field investigations.

Napa Valley Historical Ecology Atlas (Project)

The Napa Valley Historical Ecology Atlas takes readers on a richly illustrated tour of the iconic Napa Valley landscape from 200 years ago to the present and future.

Using the pioneering SFEI Historical Ecology approach, the Atlas challenges many preconceived notions about the nature of California landscapes, and suggests strategies to increase the health and resilience of local watersheds based on an understanding of how natural systems function. The Atlas is designed to support a broad range of local efforts for ecological restoration and watershed stewardship in Napa Valley, while providing a new and accessible model for historical ecology studies in other regions.