Julie Beagle's picture

Julie Beagle

Environmental Scientist
Resilient Landscapes Program
510-746-7312

Julie Beagle joined SFEI in 2010 as a geomorphologist in the Resilient Landscape program. Her work focuses on fluvial and tidal geomorphic processes in Bay Area rivers and wetlands, and she is particularly interested in the physical and biological responses to sea level rise and climate change. Her work also examines how landscapes have changed since European contact, and uses this information to guide landscape-scale restoration strategies in Bay Area watersheds and the Delta. She received a master’s degree from UC Berkeley in Environmental Planning in 2010 focusing on geomorphology and watershed management. Previously, Julie worked at the California Land Stewardship Institute and served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in agroforestry in West Africa. She has a bachelor of arts in history and environmental science from Barnard College, Columbia University.

Related Projects, News, and Events

Delta Landscapes Project (Project)

The Delta Landscapes Project, which began in 2012 and will run through 2016, has developed a body of work to inform landscape-scale restoration of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta ecosystem.

Photo credit: Kingmond Young

Flood Control 2.0 Wins an Outstanding Environmental Project Award! (News)

The Flood Control 2.0 project team was presented with an Outstanding Environmental Project Award at the 13th Biennial State of the Estuary Conference in Oakland, CA. The award is given by the Friends of the San Francisco Estuary to projects that benefit the San Francisco-Bay Delta Estuary and its watersheds.

Resilience Atlas (Project)

The Resilience Atlas is a compilation of cutting-edge science, creative visions and relevant spatial data to support planners, designers, policy-makers, and residents in the creation of the healthy cities, shorelines and surrounding landscapes of the future. The main goal of the Resilience Atlas is to make the science of resilience more accessible to help communities successfully adapt and thrive in the face of climate change and other challenges.

Resilience Atlas (News)

The Resilience Atlas is an interactive mapping platform that visualizes the past, present and future conditions of the Bay’s edge and surrounding watersheds by combining layers of information, such as shoreline infrastructure, shoreline change over time, and sea level rise. 

Delta: McCormack-Williamson Tract (Project)

The McCormack-Williamson Tract (MWT) was purchased in 1999 by The Nature Conservancy with CALFED Ecosystem Restoration Program (ERP) funds. Though today it looks like many islands of the central Delta, it is situated in a unique position at the intersection between the historical north and central Delta, at the downstream end of the Mokelumne River delta. While it represents only a small portion (<0.2%) of the historical Delta, it lies in an area of hydrologic and ecological importance along the third largest river of the Delta, the Mokelumne River.

Flood Control 2.0 Completed! (News)

SFEI and several agency partners recently completed a multi-year, EPA funded project called Flood Control 2.0. The goal of the project was to develop information that is useful for integrating habitat restoration into flood management at the Bay edge. Project outputs are now available at floodcontrol.sfei.org.

A multi-partner project to create placed-based sea-level rise adaptation strategies (News)

As sea level rise accelerates in the San Francisco Bay, scientists, planners, and decision makers will need to re-envision and adapt our complex shoreline to provide ecological and social resilience. Although there are many efforts currently underway in the region to assess climate change vulnerabilities, the region lacks a coherent science-based framework for guiding and evaluating climate adaptation strategies appropriate to our diverse shoreline settings.

Sycamore Alluvial Woodland Habitat Mapping and Regeneration Study Released (News)

California sycamore (Platanus racemosa) is an iconic native tree species found in California and northern Baja California. The health and regeneration of California sycamore have been substantially affected by a wide range of factors, including hydrologic modifications of creeks, hybridization with London plane tree (Platanus x hispanica), and anthracnose. San Francisco Estuary Institute and H. T.

Sycamore alluvial woodland in Palassou Ridge. Photo credit: Amy Richey

Sycamore Alluvial Woodland Habitat Mapping and Regeneration Study (Project)

This study investigates the relative distribution, health, and regeneration patterns of two major stands of sycamore alluvial woodland (SAW) in Santa Clara County, representing managed and natural settings.  Using an array of ecological and geomorphic field analyses, we, along with our partners at H.T. Harvey, discuss site characteristics favorable to SAW health and regeneration, make recommendations for restoration and management, and identify next steps.

"A Delta Renewed" report released at the 2016 Bay-Delta Science Conference (News)

The San Francisco Estuary Institute (SFEI) released A Delta Renewed – A Guide to Science-Based Ecological Restoration in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.